The new century began with the death of Queen Victoria at Osborne House on January 22, 1901.

Isle of Wight Observer February 9th 1901

The pall used for the lying in state of her late Majesty Queen Victoria was of pure white satin, with an Oxford border of handsomely-embossed white silk and a deep flounce of most exquisite white lace. It was placed over the shell, and on it rested the Royal robes, together with the diamond coronet and Order of the Garter. This beautiful pall remained over the shell the whole time the body rested in the Chapelle Ardente at Osborne. It was made by Messrs Purnell, Royal warrant-holders, of Ryde, and they are justly proud of both the great honour conferred upon them and the knowledge that it gave the greatest satisfaction. The pall used for the funeral procession was made at the Royal School of Art for Needlework, South Kensington. It was of ivory white satin of a rich quality, with the Royal Arms embroidered in heraldic colours at each corner. The rose, shamrock and thistle were beautifully worked with stitches and surmounted by a gold crown.

Queen Victoria lying in state 1901

Mr F N Broderick is to be congratulated upon securing a magnificent photograph of the impressive scene when the remains of her late Majesty Queen Victoria were removed from Osborne House. It is a large photograph and every detail is most clear and distinct. It has been on view at the shops and has been greatly admired.

This photograph, by Hughes and Mullins, shows the lying in state at Osborne, January 1901.

King Alfonso of Spain at Ashey

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