Gun goes off in a train!

Isle of Wight Observer January 22, 1870

At the County Petty Sessions on Tuesday last, two persons whose names were given as John Smith, alias James Winter, and Henry Smith, alias Alfred Winter, of Portsmouth, were summoned on the above charge. Mr Cousins, of Portsea, appeared for the defence, and said his clients were exceedingly sorry for their very foolish conduct, and were willing to pay all expenses; and this apology, after the Bench had pointed out the possible consequences of such an act, was accepted, and the costs paid. It was a sorry conclusion, however, to so grave a charge as discharging firearms in a railway carriage. We only express our opinion that these worthies – whether their names be really Smith or Winter – will for the future remain on the mainland. The Isle of Wight is not the right spot for them.

THE TRAMWAY – The rails have now been fixed on the tramway, so that this necessary work is progressing with great rapidity. The old Coastguard house, opposite the flag staff, has been demolished, to make room for the new line of tramway, so that the appearance of that portion of the Esplanade has been considerably altered by the change.

THE ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH – It is announced that the government will take possession of the Electric Telegraph offices on the 29th instant. The arrangements at the Post-office, Ryde, are, we understand, nearly completed.

Our obituary this week records the demise of Miss Jane Kemp, the last surviving daughter of the late Mr Thomas Kemp, who as all Ryde people know, was toll keeper, at the pier gates for a long period of years. His urbanity was acknowledged by all, and his honest integrity won from the Pier Company a silver cup and a purse of £100. She died at Fulham on Tuesday week, and her remains arrived in Ryde on Monday, and were consigned to the last resting place of the family, at Newchurch, on Wednesday.

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