Crown Assembly Room, Ryde December 2, 1867

Crown Assembly Room December 2, 1867 poster
Crown Assembly Room December 2, 1867 poster

Although the date of the above concert is December 2, 1867, a similar concert must have taken place the following March, as this critique appears in the Isle of Wight Observer, of March 12, 1868.

NATIVE MINSTRELS’ CONCERT – The above concert took place on Monday evening, at the Victoria Rooms. Judging from the well-filled room, the Native Minstrels must have been gratified and well remunerated for their expenses and trouble. Of the performances itself we cannot but speak highly. The jokes, though sometimes sustained “usque ad nauseam”, were generally speaking original, and afforded very good amusement to the audience. We compliment the minstrels on their programme, and in part one we would especially mention the comic songs, which seemed to us better performed and much more popular than the ballads, although Messrs Wellington and B Williams sand their songs with much feeling. We cannot help remarking that there seemed to us a great want of power in the choruses, and would suggest the addition of two or three more members to their present number. The whole of part II was very amusing indeed, the Military Gorilla was original, and with the Four Black Crows kept the audience in very good humour. The solos on the bones and banjo were, in fact, superior to amateur performances in general, and were both deservedly encored. In the Troublesome Servant our friend the Bones was very droll. We were hardly so much gratified at the Silver Belt Jig, and the ballad which preceeded it. The performance was brought to a close by the favourite Skedaddle, and we compliment the minstrels on their success. One very great drawback during the entertainment was the noise from the gallery, accompanied by the breaking of windows, and we have no doubt, that should the minstrels be prompted to favour us with another concert, they will see the necessity of placing some person in hte gallery to ckeck the somewhat uncivilised system of applauding peculiar to Ryde boys. It would be very creditable to our Native Minstrels if they would give a fashionable entertainment or two during the season in aid of our new church, and we have no doubt that the elite of Ryde would ensure for the occasions a very select and numerous audience.

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