VICTIMISING A TOWN COUNCILLOR

Isle of Wight Observer – January 22, 1870

Robbery in Union Street

On Tuesday evening, two ladies and two gentlemen, highly aristocratic in their manner, honoured Mr Councillor Osborne’s establishment, in Union-street, with a call. A number of enquiries were made respecting the price of certain articles of clothing, and promises of extensive patronage on the part of these illustrious personages given. As an earnest, however, of their favours, they managed to take away a couple of coats, value £6. We need scarcely add the parties have not since been heard of. The only consolation the worthy Councillor has under the circumstance is that upon enquiry at the pier he found that persons answering the description of his patrons, went off by boat that evening, so that they are not likely to give him a second call. The perusal of this brief paragraph may probably put tradesmen on their guard.

AN AMUSING INCIDENT – It is well known that a great quantity of seaweed has been washed up along this coast, and some of the farmers have been carting it away for manure. On Saturday a rather laughable incident occurred on the shore. A labourer, with a one-horse wagon, was carting away seaweed, and filled his wagon as high as he possible could, forgetting that what would have been a light weight of straw manure, was, of seaweed, a most oppressive burden. On trying, however, he found that one horse was utterly unable to move the load. Two horses were tried, then three, and afterwards four; and after all double labour had to be performed, as he had to unload his cart of the greater portion of its load. The seaweed still washes up in large quantities on the shore.

Isle of Wight Observer April 23, 1870

THE LATE ROBBERY AT COUNCILLOR OSBORNE’S – The three persons who stole the two coats from Mr Osborne in January were tried at the Borough Sessions, Portsmouth, on Wednesday last, and found guilty. The prisoner David Seymour, who had been convicted twice previously, was sentenced to seven years; Mary Ann Howard, who had been convicted before, was sentenced to 18 months; and Harriet Edwards, nine months. Our townsman was not the only one they favoured with a visit. There was a lot of jewellery – gold, bracelets, rings, chains &c., found in their possession, beside some clothes stolen from Messrs Frisby’s, Gosport, and a large bundle of flannel shirts, which they had abstracted from Mr Blake, of Portsea. We are very glad to hear they have got their deserts at last, and trust that it will act as a caution to other members of the gang.

ISLE OF WIGHT LAMBS – Two hundred and fifty of these little bleating creatures arrived in Ryde from Chale, Rookley, and other parts of the Island, on Thursday, for the London market.