Isle of Wight Observer September 25, 1852

The Cab Nuisance

One of the greatest complaints we receive from visitors is, that exorbitant charges are demanded for cab hire, and in case the slightest demur is made, abuse is sure to follow the demand. we have numberless cases to prove that gross overcharges are made; we will name one or two; from the Strand to Beldornie Tower, one-horse chaise, 3s 6d; ditto to Monkton-street (about 300 yards), 2s 6d. It must be quite evident that such things as these must have a very injurious tendency, as nothing is so vexatious to visitors as to pay unreasonable demands, or submit to an altercation which generally produces the foulest language. Where, then, lies the blame? Upon the cabmen/ Certainly not, wholly; but from the want of regulations equitably arranged, and promptly enforced, for the management of the whole matter. A reasonable list of fares to the different parts of Ryde and its environs would benefit the cabman, and save him the higgling which he experiences from meanness, and from the imputation of overcharge he receives from the choleric. Besides, under a system of knowing that the charge to any given point is regulated by authority, suspicion is avoided, and scores would ride (especially in showery or hot weather) who never think of such a thing now. We trust this matter will engage the attention of the new Board, as soon as the Public Health Act comes into operation.

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